COVID-19 Information

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The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and ways residents can help. Given the amount of information available, and specific needs of the community, we have created separate pages for businesses, community resources and assistance, and construction. Make sure to check out these pages for information specific to those topics.


The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and ways residents can help. Given the amount of information available, and specific needs of the community, we have created separate pages for businesses, community resources and assistance, and construction. Make sure to check out these pages for information specific to those topics.


  • May 29 - Governor Inslee Updates Phased Reopening Requirements

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    3 days ago

    May 29, 2020 – On Friday, May 29, Governor Inslee announced that the Stay Home, Stay Healthy Order will expire as planned at midnight on May 31, 2020. Replacing the Stay Home Order, is an expanded Safe Start – Washington’s Phased Reopening.

    The newly expanded Safe Start gives counties more flexibility in allowing additional approved activities. A county not yet eligible for Phase 2 may move into a "modified" Phase 1, allowing for some Phase 2 activities.

    King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a proposed plan to re-open limited activity in the county, under the option to enter into...

    May 29, 2020 – On Friday, May 29, Governor Inslee announced that the Stay Home, Stay Healthy Order will expire as planned at midnight on May 31, 2020. Replacing the Stay Home Order, is an expanded Safe Start – Washington’s Phased Reopening.

    The newly expanded Safe Start gives counties more flexibility in allowing additional approved activities. A county not yet eligible for Phase 2 may move into a "modified" Phase 1, allowing for some Phase 2 activities.

    King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a proposed plan to re-open limited activity in the county, under the option to enter into a modified Phase 1. Pending state approval, King County is preparing to move forward to allow limited or modified opening for business sectors and activities including recreation and fitness, in-store retail, real estate, personal and professional services, and more.

    The Governor also announced that the updated target for incidence of new COVID-19 cases reported during a two-week period is now less than 25 per 100,000 residents, where the prior goal was less 10 per 100,000 residents.

    Earlier this week, King County released a key indicators data dashboard that provides a snapshot of useful indicators and metrics related to COVID-19 activity in the county. The dashboard provides data and trends for the numbers of reported cases; the growth, stabilization, or shrinking of the outbreak; testing capacity; healthcare system readiness; and more.

    Beginning June 1, any county can apply to move to the next phase. The application process will involve meeting criteria established by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) around five key areas:

    • Virus activity,
    • Healthcare system readiness,
    • Testing,
    • Contact tracing, and
    • Protecting vulnerable populations.

    Also, beginning June 8, all workers will be required to wear face coverings and employers must post signage that strongly encourages customers to wear face coverings.

    Follow this link for more information on the Safe Start - Washington's Phased Reopening by County.

  • Updates from the City Manager

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    3 days ago

    City Manager Jessi Bon hosted eleven live City situation briefings on Thursday afternoons from mid-March through May. Beginning in June, she is transitioning to updating the community via her City Manager's Report at the beginning of each regular Council Meeting.

    The May 28 Situation Briefing was the eleventh and final live briefing. City Manager Jessi Bon will continue to update the community on City operations and coronavirus-related information via her City Manager's Report at the beginning of each regular Council Meeting.

    Council Meetings are scheduled the first and third Tuesday of each month and are broadcast live on MITV-21 and...

    City Manager Jessi Bon hosted eleven live City situation briefings on Thursday afternoons from mid-March through May. Beginning in June, she is transitioning to updating the community via her City Manager's Report at the beginning of each regular Council Meeting.

    The May 28 Situation Briefing was the eleventh and final live briefing. City Manager Jessi Bon will continue to update the community on City operations and coronavirus-related information via her City Manager's Report at the beginning of each regular Council Meeting.

    Council Meetings are scheduled the first and third Tuesday of each month and are broadcast live on MITV-21 and the Council's YouTube Channel.

    Links to recent City Manager's Report videos and PowerPoint Presentations are available below.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    June 2 - Video (watch live) and PowerPoint Presentation (available after)

    May 19 - Video and PowerPoint Presentation

    May 5 - Video and PowerPoint Presentation

    April 21- Video and PowerPoint Presentation

    April 7 - Video and PowerPoint Presentation

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Follow this link to access all eleven Thursday Situation Briefing videos and PowerPoint Presentations.

    Have questions? Please email them to: citymanager@mercergov.org we will try to address them during the presentation.


  • Easing of Restrictions on Religious Gatherings

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    5 days ago

    Governor Inslee announced the easing of restrictions on religious gatherings.

    May 27, 2020: Governor Jay Inslee announced the state's plan for easing certain restrictions on in-person religious services for Phase 1 and Phase 2 of Washington's Safe Start reopening plan.

    Phase 1

    • Outdoor religious services on an organization’s property can be held with up to 100 individuals
    • Physical distancing and face coverings are required.

    Phase 2

    • Indoor religious services can be held at 25% capacity or with fewer than 50 individuals whichever is less.
    • Includes holiday celebrations, weddings, funerals, etc.
    • In-home services or counseling at a person’s residence with 5...

    Governor Inslee announced the easing of restrictions on religious gatherings.

    May 27, 2020: Governor Jay Inslee announced the state's plan for easing certain restrictions on in-person religious services for Phase 1 and Phase 2 of Washington's Safe Start reopening plan.

    Phase 1

    • Outdoor religious services on an organization’s property can be held with up to 100 individuals
    • Physical distancing and face coverings are required.

    Phase 2

    • Indoor religious services can be held at 25% capacity or with fewer than 50 individuals whichever is less.
    • Includes holiday celebrations, weddings, funerals, etc.
    • In-home services or counseling at a person’s residence with 5 total individuals or less.

    For more information or to read the guidance, click here.

  • Unemployment Fraud

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    5 days ago

    Washington has experienced a surge in unemployment fraud, affecting residents across the state including Mercer Islanders.

    A surge in suspected fraudulent unemployment claims, estimated at around $1.6 million, hit as the state works to process legitimate claims for jobless benefits. The surge was so great, that the state paused unemployment payments for 2 days in mid-May while it investigated a wave of fraudulent claims.

    If an unemployment claim is falsely made using your information – name and/or social security number - there are a number of recommended steps to take:

    1. Contact the Washington State Employment Security Department (ESD)

    Go...

    Washington has experienced a surge in unemployment fraud, affecting residents across the state including Mercer Islanders.

    A surge in suspected fraudulent unemployment claims, estimated at around $1.6 million, hit as the state works to process legitimate claims for jobless benefits. The surge was so great, that the state paused unemployment payments for 2 days in mid-May while it investigated a wave of fraudulent claims.

    If an unemployment claim is falsely made using your information – name and/or social security number - there are a number of recommended steps to take:

    1. Contact the Washington State Employment Security Department (ESD)

    Go to https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment/unemployment-benefits-fraud to fill out the online form. You will need to provide personal information to help the state identify you, including: full name, social security number, address, date of birth, and a brief description of how you found out an imposter-fraud claim was filed. This is important: If you receive any payments from the Employment Security Department, report those and return all payments.

    2. File a Report with the Mercer Island Police Department

    To file a police report, call our non-emergency line at 425-577-5656. You will receive an incident number. Make sure to save the incident number for steps 3 and 4. It’s good practice to keep a file folder or journal with the information from this incident.

    3. Contact the Three Major Credit Bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax

    Obtain your free annual credit report by visiting AnnualCreditReport.com or calling 1-877-322-8228. As a victim of identity theft, you also have the right to check your credit activity monthly. Make sure to report the fraudulent claim with the credit bureaus and provide the bureaus with the incident number from the police report you filed in step 2. Also, set up a fraud alert or have your credit frozen with each of the credit bureaus.

    Experian.com/help
    888-EXPERIAN (888-397-3742)

    TransUnion.com/credit-help
    888-909-8872

    Equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services
    800-685-1111

    Fraud Alert

    A fraud alert will make it harder for someone to open new accounts using your name. When you have an alert on your report, a business must verify your identity before it issues new credit in your name. The fraud alert is free and is set for one year but is renewable. To place a fraud alert, contact one of the three credit bureaus (that bureau must then tell the other two credit bureaus).

    Freeze your credit

    Also known as a security freeze, this free tool lets you restrict access to your credit report, which in turn makes it more difficult for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name. Most creditors need to see your credit report before they approve a new account. If they can’t see your report, they may not extend the credit.

    4. File a Report with the Federal Trade Commission

    Based on the information you enter, an Identity Theft report and recovery plan will be created specifically for you. This identity theft report also proves to businesses that someone stole your identity. It also guarantees you certain rights. When you make your report, have your incident number from step 2 ready. Visit the FTC’s identity theft information pages to file a report or for more information at www.identitytheft.gov.

    5. Contact the Post Office

    Check with the post office to make sure mail has not been redirected to a different address without your permission.


    Protecting Your Identity

    New reports of identity theft and unemployment fraud are coming in daily. If you haven’t received word that your information has been compromised, there are steps you can take now, to protect your identity.

    • Check your credit annually.
    • Consider freezing your credit.
    • Check your mail regularly. If you receive credit cards you have not applied for or notification of an unemployment benefits application, take action immediately.
  • Two cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) in Washington state

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    10 days ago

    Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. Health officials do not yet know what causes MIS-C, however, they do know that many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19.

    May 22, 2020, OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Health (DOH), Snohomish Health District and Public Health—Seattle & King County are confirming two cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19.

    The patients, one Snohomish County resident and...

    Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. Health officials do not yet know what causes MIS-C, however, they do know that many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19.

    May 22, 2020, OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Health (DOH), Snohomish Health District and Public Health—Seattle & King County are confirming two cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19.

    The patients, one Snohomish County resident and one King County resident, both received treatment at Seattle Children’s Hospital. One patient is under the age of 10 and the other is between 10 and 19 years of age.

    These are the only cases reported in Washington state residents to date. Health care providers in the United Kingdom were the first to recognize cases in late April, and providers in other states have identified cases as well. Following increased reports of previously healthy children presenting with a severe inflammatory syndrome with Kawasaki disease-like symptoms, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a health advisory last Thursday with a case definition.

    “In Washington, we are tracking this issue closely and working with local health departments and providers to learn more,” said Dr. Kathy Lofy, state health officer for DOH. “Early last week we asked all health care providers in the state to be on the lookout and immediately report possible cases to local health authorities.”

    The current case definition includes the following:

    • Under the age of 21, with a fever, laboratory evidence of inflammation, and severe illness involving more than two organs that requires hospitalization; AND
    • No other plausible diagnoses; AND
    • Positive COVID-19 test, or exposure to a confirmed case, within the four weeks prior to the onset of symptoms.

    “Seattle Children’s is committed to caring for our region’s most medically complex children, and our team of specialists is well-equipped to care for children presenting with this newly identified syndrome,” said Dr. John McGuire, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at Seattle Children’s. “Although it remains very uncommon, parents should call their primary care providers if their children are showing new or unusual symptoms, such as a persistent fever or headache, abdominal pain with or without diarrhea, fatigue, and respiratory symptoms such as shortness of breath.”

    “Parents who have concerns about possible COVID-19 in their children should contact their healthcare provider promptly,” said Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County. “Identifying this syndrome early is important because treatments are available for the serious complications.”

    “While the vast majority of children appear to have mild or asymptomatic infection, it’s important to remember that—although rare—some children can develop serious complications like these,” said Dr. Chris Spitters, health officer for the Snohomish Health District. “Our thoughts are with the young patient, their family and the care team at Seattle Children’s, and we wish for a speedy recovery.”

    Given privacy concerns, public health officials will not release additional information on these cases.

    Healthcare providers who have cared or are caring for patients younger than 21 years of age meeting MIS-C criteria should report suspected cases to their local public health agency. Additional guidance for pediatric healthcare providers was issued by CDC on May 15.

    For more information on COVID-19, visit the Department of Health’s website or call 1-800-525-0127. More information on MIS-C and COVID-19 is also available from Seattle Children’s Hospital, Snohomish County Health District , Public Health – Seattle & King County and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Testing Locations in King County

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    10 days ago

    Expanded testing now available in King County.

    To help prevent the spread of COVID-19 Public Health – Seattle & King County recommends that anyone with COVID-19 symptoms or who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 be tested right away.

    Public Health strongly urges anyone who has even mild COVID-19 symptoms to call their healthcare provider as soon as they start to feel sick to ask about COVID-19 testing. COVID-19 symptoms are cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, chills, muscle pain, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell.

    It is important not to wait...

    Expanded testing now available in King County.

    To help prevent the spread of COVID-19 Public Health – Seattle & King County recommends that anyone with COVID-19 symptoms or who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 be tested right away.

    Public Health strongly urges anyone who has even mild COVID-19 symptoms to call their healthcare provider as soon as they start to feel sick to ask about COVID-19 testing. COVID-19 symptoms are cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, chills, muscle pain, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell.

    It is important not to wait to be tested. If you have COVID-19, you are contagious. A COVID-19 test will let you know if you are infected so you can protect your family, friends and community by keeping yourself away from others. Staying away from others when you have COVID-19 is crucial to slow the spread of the virus in our community. You should also call your healthcare provider and ask for a test if you live with or have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19. Even if you don’t have symptoms, you may be contagious and should stay away from others.

    There are several low or no-cost testing sites in King County that are open to anyone who cannot access COVID-19 testing through their regular healthcare provider – a list of sites is available at this link. Most of these sites are non-profit Community Health Centers.

    King County residents can contact these sites directly for testing hours and to make an appointment. If you are still having difficulty accessing a COVID-19 test, call the King County COVID-19 call center, which is open seven days a week 8 a.m. – 7 p.m., at 206-477-3977.

    Published in PHSKC's Public Health Insider.

  • Reopening Washington - A Phased Approach

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    about 1 month ago

    Wondering when your hair stylist can open or when you can eat out at your favorite restaurant? The state's four phased approach to reopening details when various industries can open and how they will do so.

    Updated May 20: Gov. Jay Inslee's phased approach to how Washington state will reopen businesses and modifying physical distancing measures.

    Businesses are expected to implement any additional requirements developed specifically for their industry. Moving forward, there will be four phases allowing more areas of the state to re-open after each phase. A minimum of three weeks is required between each phase.

    Phase...

    Wondering when your hair stylist can open or when you can eat out at your favorite restaurant? The state's four phased approach to reopening details when various industries can open and how they will do so.

    Updated May 20: Gov. Jay Inslee's phased approach to how Washington state will reopen businesses and modifying physical distancing measures.

    Businesses are expected to implement any additional requirements developed specifically for their industry. Moving forward, there will be four phases allowing more areas of the state to re-open after each phase. A minimum of three weeks is required between each phase.

    Phase 1: The state entered Phase 1 on May 5.

    Phase 2: Beginning no earlier than June 1.

    Additional expansions of outdoor recreation activities would be allowed, as well as small gatherings of 5 or fewer people, new construction and in-store retail purchases with health restrictions. Barber shops and salons could reopen and house cleaning services. Restaurants could reopen with 50 % capacity and table size no larger than 5. Some professional services and offices could open as well, even though teleworking would remain strongly encouraged. Pet care services including grooming could resume.

    Phase 3: Gatherings of 50 people or less, including sports activities, would be allowed, and non-essential travel could resume. Restaurants could move up to 75% capacity and tables up to 10 people, and bars at 25% capacity; gyms and movie theaters could reopen at 50 % capacity; retail, libraries, museums and government buildings could reopen. Recreational facilities like pools could open at 50% capacity. Nightclubs and entertainment venues would still not be able to reopen.

    Phase 4: Would involve resuming the majority of public interactions. Gatherings of more than 50 people would be allowed, but still while practicing social distancing.

    Every phase will still require social distancing and appropriate health precautions including the use of personal protective equipment in a number of workplaces. Watch Gov. Inslee’s press conference.

    Essential Business Guidance

    Many parts of the economy are already allowed to operate safely as essential businesses. For a list of essential businesses click here.

    Challenge Seattle and the Washington Roundtable have developed a business checklist which is a great starting point for businesses as they prepare for a Safe Start. Our shared goal is to establish clear requirements that everyone can understand and apply — employers, workers and customers.

    Find more information on that here: https://coronavirus.wa.gov/what-you-need-know/covid-19-risk-assessment-dashboard

    These phases depend on continued success in slowing the spread of COVID-19 and meeting four capabilities including:

    • health care system readiness
    • testing capacity
    • ability to do contact investigations
    • ability to protect high-risk populations.

    The Governor extended the "Stay Home, Stay Healthy" Order through May 31.

    Not every part of the state is experiencing #COVID19 the same way. County variances are allowed. Smaller counties could reopen. Counties with fewer than 50,000 residents not hit hard by #COVID19 will be able to apply to the Department of Health for a variance that will allow the county to open to the second phase. Cities and counties can also take more strict actions than what the state is mandating. That is up to them based on their public health needs and local decision making.

  • Statewide Contact Tracing Initiative

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    18 days ago

    On May 12, Governor Jay Inslee announced that the state is launching a voluntary contact tracing program. When someone tests positive, an interviewer will reach out by phone. They will ask who that person has been in close contact with, then reach out to those other people to let them know they have been exposed. Contact tracers will include members of the Washington State National Guard, Department of Licensing, and state/local health professionals.

    Follow this link for more information about case investigations and contact tracing.

    The information collected is only used by public health professionals and is confidential...

    On May 12, Governor Jay Inslee announced that the state is launching a voluntary contact tracing program. When someone tests positive, an interviewer will reach out by phone. They will ask who that person has been in close contact with, then reach out to those other people to let them know they have been exposed. Contact tracers will include members of the Washington State National Guard, Department of Licensing, and state/local health professionals.

    Follow this link for more information about case investigations and contact tracing.

    The information collected is only used by public health professionals and is confidential. It will not be shared. Contacts will not be told the name of the person who may have exposed them to COVID-19. These professional interviewers will ask about symptoms, recent exposure and demographic questions such as age, address, gender and ethnicity. The statewide contact tracing team will be trained and available by May 15.

    Public facing businesses will collect customer information via a daily log. Information and protocols for reopening are being updated and released regularly. Click here to watch the Governor's press conference for more information.

    “Privacy is the utmost importance. All data received and inputted is from the DOH’s secure database. All of this is voluntary. We’re only contacting people that have already agreed to be contacted and an individual can end the call at any time.” ~ Lt. Col. Steve Hobbs, WA State National Guard

    Getting Tested

    A key part of the program is testing. King County Public Health now recommends that anyone with symptoms or who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 be tested right away.

    Most testing is conducted through primary care providers, however, if you need to be tested and don’t have a provider who can do the test, call the King County COVID-19 call center at 206-477-3977. Open 7 days a week 8 AM – 7 PM.


  • Directive from King County Health: Wear Face Coverings in Public

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    21 days ago

    Starting on May 18, King County residents are directed to wear face coverings in most public settings.

    The King County Health Officer issued a directive to wear face coverings in public places, both indoors in places such as grocery stores and businesses, and also outdoors when it’s difficult to maintain six feet apart from others. While face coverings do not replace proper hygiene or social distancing as protection measures, they can help to protect others and slow spread of COVID-19 by blocking infectious droplets from spreading when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes or speaks.

    The Centers for Disease Control...

    Starting on May 18, King County residents are directed to wear face coverings in most public settings.

    The King County Health Officer issued a directive to wear face coverings in public places, both indoors in places such as grocery stores and businesses, and also outdoors when it’s difficult to maintain six feet apart from others. While face coverings do not replace proper hygiene or social distancing as protection measures, they can help to protect others and slow spread of COVID-19 by blocking infectious droplets from spreading when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes or speaks.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define cloth face coverings as fabric coverings including cloth face masks, scarves and bandana coverings, or any homemade face covering made of cotton fabric. The CDC also makes clear that cloth face coverings should:

    • Include multiple layers of fabric
    • Allow for breathing without restriction
    • Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape

    Make sure you are wearing your face covering properly!

    Everyone is strongly urged to wear face coverings in places such as:

    • Stores that sell food and beverages (including: grocery stores, pharmacies, corner stores, convenience stores, liquor stores, farmers' markets, food banks, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, big box stores that sell groceries, and similar places that sell food).

    • Retail stores (including: convenience stores, pet supply stores, auto supplies and repair shops, hardware and home improvement stores, garden stores that sell supplies for growing food, office supply stores, and home appliance stores).

    • Restaurant take-out and food businesses. Employees who prepare, carry out, and deliver food must wear masks.

    • Cannabis shops and stores that sell dietary supplements.

    • Tobacco and vapor shops.

    • Buses, light rail, and other forms of public transportation.

    The Health Officer’s Directive relies on individual compliance; there is no penalty for not wearing a mask.

    Other details regarding the directive:

    Operators and riders on King County Metro will be required to wear face coverings.

    • Metro operators will not prevent passengers without face coverings from boarding, but recorded reminders will play on the vehicle’s public address system informing riders of the face covering policy.
      • Security officers will communicate public health guidance to riders who are not wearing a face covering or staying apart from other passengers.

    Face coverings are not directed to be worn when:

    • At home
      • In your car alone or if you’re only with members of your household
      • Exercising outdoors, like walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, when appropriate social distancing is possible

    Is anyone exempt from wearing a face covering?

    • Face coverings should not be worn by children who are two years of age or younger, or children under the age of twelve unless supervised by an adult.
      • Additionally, if wearing a face covering would be difficult or harmful, an individual should not do so. Examples would be someone who has a physical disability that makes it difficult to easily wear or remove a face covering; someone who is deaf and uses facial and mouth movements as part of communications; someone who has been advised by a medical professional to not wear one; or someone who has trouble breathing or cannot remove a face covering without assistance.

    For more information visit www.kingcounty.gov/covid.

    Still need a mask? Check out these DIY Face Mask options from King County or these options from the CDC.! Have you seen the 45 second video from the Surgeon General? If not, he shares the easiest face covering option.

  • Enjoying the Great Outdoors

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    24 days ago

    The rumors are true, meteorologists are predicting temperatures cresting 80 degrees this weekend!

    Mercer Island parks and trails are open for non-organized recreation, and so is the Luther Burbank dog park, and the P-Patch. Many Islanders are likely planning on also getting out on the water now that boating and fishing are allowed.

    Continue to practice physical distancing in parks, on trails, and while boating.

    Remember to keep your distance from others and avoid gatherings. All visitors are asked to “Keep it Moving” while using the parks/trails for walking, running, riding, and rolling. Users may also want to consider visiting...

    The rumors are true, meteorologists are predicting temperatures cresting 80 degrees this weekend!

    Mercer Island parks and trails are open for non-organized recreation, and so is the Luther Burbank dog park, and the P-Patch. Many Islanders are likely planning on also getting out on the water now that boating and fishing are allowed.

    Continue to practice physical distancing in parks, on trails, and while boating.

    Remember to keep your distance from others and avoid gatherings. All visitors are asked to “Keep it Moving” while using the parks/trails for walking, running, riding, and rolling. Users may also want to consider visiting early in the morning when parks are much less crowded.

    With our limited staffing, City parks won’t look as maintained as you may be used to. You can help by following “pack it in, pack it out” practices.

    Boating and fishing are now allowed.

    The MI Boat Launch is open! As you make your plans to get out on the water, please remember your water safety. Lake Washington is still COLD, and all swimmers and boaters should always wear a life jacket. (See below for more information.)

    Many State and County parks and trails are now open.

    Many State and King County parks and trails reopened this week. Here are a just few tips to help you and your family stay healthy while enjoying the outdoors:

    1. Plan ahead.
    2. Keep your distance.
      • Recreate with those in your household. Give others plenty of room, communicate who will step aside on the trail, and don’t forget that trail etiquette gives hikers coming uphill the right of way.
    3. Stay local.
      • Don’t stray too far from home when recreating and keep rural communities safe by minimizing stops and bringing all that you’ll need for your outing.
    4. Play it safe.
      • Keep your activities within your comfort and skill level to reduce the risk of injury and adding to the strain on our health care and emergency services.
    5. Leave no trace.
      • Take any garbage with you, including disposable face masks and gloves.

    Some of the ways we recreate have changed in the era of COVID-19, but don't worry - there are plenty of resources to help you navigate you favorite pastimes. Check out the links below to know what to do.

    Note: most large City Parks parking lots are still closed to discourage crowding.