East Seattle School Parcel Subdivision

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2825 West Mercer Way

A proposal has been submitted to subdivide this property into 14 residential lots (SUB19-002). Demolition of the East Seattle School building has been completed. The subdivision proposal is currently under review by the City.


This page will be updated with further information as it becomes available.

2825 West Mercer Way

A proposal has been submitted to subdivide this property into 14 residential lots (SUB19-002). Demolition of the East Seattle School building has been completed. The subdivision proposal is currently under review by the City.


This page will be updated with further information as it becomes available.

Have a question? Ask it here!

Do you have a question on the proposed East Seattle Subdivision?  Please submit your question here and staff will provide a response.

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    Can you explain any variances granted to this subdivision (i.e. lot coverage, maximum gross square footage, maximum height.....etc)?

    Bill G asked over 2 years ago

    There are currently no variances being requested for the subdivision.  These types of variances would be reviewed with the building permits (at a later stage in the process); however, the City is not aware of any variances being considered at this time.


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    It's not clear from the drawings how storm retention is addressed other than a bio-swale along W Mercer that is at the highest elevation of the development. How is storm retention handled? Especially along 62nd.

    Bill G asked over 2 years ago

    Preliminary plans show treatment of runoff for basic water quality being proposed through a biofiltration swale and on-site storm filter. In the developed condition, upstream runoff will be intercepted by ditches and catch basins along the project frontages.  Please bear in mind that these plans are conceptual in nature only and will be more thoroughly reviewed with the site development permit.  You may also find it helpful to review the drainage report prepared by Blueline (dated 3/1/19) and provided with the submittal: http://mieplan.mercergov.org/public/SUB19-002/Submittal%201/DrainageRpt%203.1.19.pdf.


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    What are the 4 Density City Areas- Where are the others located and what size sq ft is the per lot size? IE East Seattle is 894.43 sq ft per lot. East Seattle has 30 ft lots but most homes are built on a large sized lot. No house can be built on a 30ft lot so how can the developer say that the density is similar to the East Seattle Area. For instance our house is on a 120’ lot. Thank you

    ESGrad asked over 2 years ago

    The City has four residential zones, R-8.4, R-9.6, R-12 and R-15, allowing minimum lot sizes of 8,400 square feet, 9,600 square feet, 12,000 square feet and 15,000 square feet respectively.  A map of the city's zoning designations is available here: http://mercerislandgis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=f4464290a9b24d6496b43b39dea42a84

    In the East Seattle neighborhood, the are many lots that are below the current minimum lot size of 8,400 square feet.  These lots were created long ago, before zoning and minimum lot size requirements were in place.  In the blocks surrounding the East Seattle School site, there are many lots in 3,000-8,000 square foot size range, as well as many larger lots.  Because there are so many existing small lots, the density (i.e. the number of homes per acre of land) of these blocks is likely higher than what is proposed on the East Seattle School site where the lots will all be 8,400 square feet or greater.

    More information on the City's zoning requirements and lot sizes is available here: http://www.mercergov.org/Page.asp?NavID=368

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    The traffic and transportation infrastructure improvement should be required of the developer and be his cost burden as he and his buyers will gain the benefit. Too often developers' plans and cost do not include alleviation of the increase traffic consequences during and after completion of the project - leaving the burden (property tax, car tabs, delays, aggravation) on the residents of the city and the city resources to bear - case in point Sammamish and other recent development areas of Mercer Island. (1) How will the developer plan to minimize construction obstruction and delays during peak traffic hours for residents travelling on West Mercer Way going on/off Mercer Island and to Mercer Island city center during the project? (2) Since the additional housing will likely add more modes of transportation (cars, bikes, ubers, etc) and developer's own construction equipment and men onto the road (West Mercer Way, side lanes/streets/driveways), how will the City work with the developer to include in his cost (without transferring the the burden to the Mercer Island residents and city resources) the repair and improvement of West Mercer Way (wear and tear from construction, safety traffic and street lighting) to handle increase traffic load, congestions and delays?

    Alice asked over 2 years ago

    The Engineering Division and the City's site inspector work closely with developers to manage impacts of construction on local streets and neighborhoods.  The applicant's plans for work that impacts streets and right-of-ways must be reviewed and approved by the city.  The City limits trucking and work within roadways during peak travel times, especially on major arterials. Use of the city right-of-way during construction also requires a separate permit. 

    The project applicant will also be required to evaluate transportation concurrency and to conduct a traffic impact analysis.  This will ensure that intersections near the project have capacity to maintain the same level of service and that the project will not create any safety or congestion issues.  In addition, the project must pay transportation impact fees to the City when the subdivision receives final approval. These fees are pooled to provide funding for the City to address transportation needs created by new development.



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    Hello! Thank you for hosting an information session on June 20th. Unfortunately, I was unable to attend that session. I am wondering if there are renderings/master plan details available for me to view? I think it's great that you are engaging the community in this significant development.

    MK Neher asked over 2 years ago

    There are not currently any renderings available.  The plans that were submitted with the subdivision application is available here: https://letstalk.mercergov.org/3603/documents/5071.  I also just posted a short summary of the June 20 meeting and the staff powerpoint presentation.   ~ Alison Van Gorp

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    The lot is 125,200 sq.ft. Divided by 14 residential lots = 8943 sq.ft. per lot. Question: Given the lot size, how large would the 14 houses be allowed to be?

    jpfriedman asked over 2 years ago

    The maximum lot coverage allowed for a house and driveway in the R8.4 zone is 40% of the lot size.  For an 8,400 square foot lot, the maximum lot coverage could not exceed 3,360 square feet.  There is also a 40% gross floor area maximum, which would provide for approximately 1,680 square feet for each story of a 2-story house (resulting in a total floor area of 3,360 square feet).  The gross floor area calculation does not include basements, so in this example, the house could include 3,360 square feet, plus a basement.  The house footprint would also need to fit within the required setbacks, which consist of 20 feet front yard, 25 feet rear yard, and 15 foot combined side yard (minimum of 5 feet on either side).  ~ Mona Davis

Page last updated: 06 August 2021, 12:56