COVID-19 Information

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The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and ways residents can help. Given the amount of information available, and specific needs of the community, we have created separate pages for businesses, community resources and assistance, and construction. Make sure to check out these pages for information specific to those topics.


The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and ways residents can help. Given the amount of information available, and specific needs of the community, we have created separate pages for businesses, community resources and assistance, and construction. Make sure to check out these pages for information specific to those topics.


  • State Easing Outdoor Restrictions

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    about 1 month ago

    Beginning Tuesday, May 5, some outdoor recreation will be allowed with appropriate safety precautions.

    Fishing, hunting, playing golf, day use at state parks, state public lands managed by the Department of Natural Resources and at state Fish and Wildlife areas are now permitted, however some parks may not open immediately due to impacts on rural communities and the potential for crowding. State Parks is working with local communities and its partners to determine the best approach and timing to reopening these areas.

    Visitor centers, camping and other overnight accommodations on state-managed lands will remain closed.

    King County Parks is working through a phased-in reopening scenario for its parks, trails and other facilities, likely starting with natural lands and regional trails.

    Parks patrons, anglers, and hunters should only venture out well-prepared.

    The public should expect limited access to restrooms. WDFW is also recommending that people bring their own handwashing materials, toilet paper, and masks or bandanas, and be prepared to change plans if sites appear congested.

    Any additional relaxing of outdoor recreation restrictions will depend on data and compliance. The governor outlined the following guidelines:

    • If you feel sick at all, even a little bit, you need to stay home. Wait until you feel better.
    • Gatherings are still prohibited. You can golf or fish or hunt or go to the park with people in your own household, but not with your other friends or family just yet.
    • People must recreate locally: Do not travel farther than necessary and do not stay overnight to recreate.
    • Any public land or recreation site may be closed to curtail unsafe conditions.
    • Practice social distancing at trailheads, boat launches, and all areas where you encounter others and utilize facial coverings in any situation where social distancing is not possible.
    • Golfers: space out tee times, limits on size of parties, walking-only (unless for mobility), no on-site beverage or food service (take-away only) and more.
    • Bringing your own food and supplies when possible will also help reduce exposure.

    Click the links below for more information :

    Beginning Tuesday, May 5, some outdoor recreation will be allowed with appropriate safety precautions.

    Fishing, hunting, playing golf, day use at state parks, state public lands managed by the Department of Natural Resources and at state Fish and Wildlife areas are now permitted, however some parks may not open immediately due to impacts on rural communities and the potential for crowding. State Parks is working with local communities and its partners to determine the best approach and timing to reopening these areas.

    Visitor centers, camping and other overnight accommodations on state-managed lands will remain closed.

    King County Parks is working through a phased-in reopening scenario for its parks, trails and other facilities, likely starting with natural lands and regional trails.

    Parks patrons, anglers, and hunters should only venture out well-prepared.

    The public should expect limited access to restrooms. WDFW is also recommending that people bring their own handwashing materials, toilet paper, and masks or bandanas, and be prepared to change plans if sites appear congested.

    Any additional relaxing of outdoor recreation restrictions will depend on data and compliance. The governor outlined the following guidelines:

    • If you feel sick at all, even a little bit, you need to stay home. Wait until you feel better.
    • Gatherings are still prohibited. You can golf or fish or hunt or go to the park with people in your own household, but not with your other friends or family just yet.
    • People must recreate locally: Do not travel farther than necessary and do not stay overnight to recreate.
    • Any public land or recreation site may be closed to curtail unsafe conditions.
    • Practice social distancing at trailheads, boat launches, and all areas where you encounter others and utilize facial coverings in any situation where social distancing is not possible.
    • Golfers: space out tee times, limits on size of parties, walking-only (unless for mobility), no on-site beverage or food service (take-away only) and more.
    • Bringing your own food and supplies when possible will also help reduce exposure.

    Click the links below for more information :

  • Support for Mercer Island BUSINESSES

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    3 months ago

    The City is working closely with the Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce to provide information specific to businesses. As the virus spreads, some smaller establishments will be challenged by additional cleaning needs and/or reduced staffing due to quarantine concerns.
    For more information, documents, and links to useful websites visit our BUSINESS resources page.

    Wondering what RESTAURANTS are OPEN?

    The City is working closely with the Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce to provide information specific to businesses. As the virus spreads, some smaller establishments will be challenged by additional cleaning needs and/or reduced staffing due to quarantine concerns.
    For more information, documents, and links to useful websites visit our BUSINESS resources page.

    Wondering what RESTAURANTS are OPEN?
  • COMMUNITY Resources

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    3 months ago

    This community has a longstanding and extensive emergency preparedness network composed of many hundreds of trained volunteers with relationships across all neighborhoods.

    While the City does not have the capacity to check in on all vulnerable populations, we encourage "neighbor to neighbor" support during this time. For example, if you are aware of an elderly resident concerned about leaving their home, you may be able to help by delivering meals or groceries - remember to follow Public Health guidelines for social distancing to prevent an unintentional exposure.

    The City’s Youth and Family Services Department provides case management and mental health services to Island seniors and these will continue during the outbreak.


    For more information, documents, and helpful links visit our COMMUNITY resources page.

    This community has a longstanding and extensive emergency preparedness network composed of many hundreds of trained volunteers with relationships across all neighborhoods.

    While the City does not have the capacity to check in on all vulnerable populations, we encourage "neighbor to neighbor" support during this time. For example, if you are aware of an elderly resident concerned about leaving their home, you may be able to help by delivering meals or groceries - remember to follow Public Health guidelines for social distancing to prevent an unintentional exposure.

    The City’s Youth and Family Services Department provides case management and mental health services to Island seniors and these will continue during the outbreak.


    For more information, documents, and helpful links visit our COMMUNITY resources page.

  • Public Health: The Danger of Ending Social Distancing too Early

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    about 2 months ago


    Published by Public Health Insider, a publication of Public Health Seattle - King County (PHSKC)

    The danger of ending social distancing too early: A conversation with our Health Officer

    By , PHSKC

    You may have heard about a couple of recent studies that suggest that our social distancing measures appear to be making a difference in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in King County. That’s encouraging news.

    The studies also emphasize that we need to continue to stay strong with the stay at home order if we are to continue to succeed in decreasing and delaying the outbreak peak. But we also see the enormous economic toll that social distancing orders are creating.

    To understand more about where we are in the outbreak and what it would take to relax some of the social distancing measures, we asked our health officer, Dr. Jeff Duchin to talk about both the communicable disease aspects and undesirable consequences of COVID-19.

    If the initial studies suggest that our efforts at social distancing are working to “flatten the curve,” why is it so important to stay steadfast with the Stay Home order and other social distancing measures?

    People in King County deserve the credit for making a real difference in the course of this outbreak by staying at home and decreasing non-essential close contact with others. I understand how difficult this is. Everyone should know that these sacrifices are preventing many illnesses and deaths throughout our community, including family members, friends and loved ones, and co-workers.

    The modeling done by IHME at the University of Washington is somewhat reassuring, but the conclusions are not certain. For example, the model assumes that our outbreak is similar to Wuhan, China and that the current social distancing efforts are unchanged over time. It doesn’t show what happens if people stop complying or are not as effective as they assume.

    Our success at distancing has limited the number of people that have been infected, and that also means most of us remain susceptible to the virus. If we go back to business as usual, many people will be infected relatively quickly because COVID-19 remains circulating in the population. We remain at risk for a large outbreak that would overwhelm the healthcare system. That’s why the recent studies clearly state that we need to continue to stay strong with the Stay Home order for now.

    No one should take these findings as an indication to relax our social distancing strategy at this time. The threat of a rebound that could overwhelm the healthcare system remains if we let up too soon.

    What does it look like if the healthcare system is overwhelmed?

    Right now we’re witnessing that in other places, such as New York City, where they are short on healthcare workers and critical resources to provide the usual level of care that people expect from our hospitals. And even though we’ve “flattened the curve” and decreased the number who are infected locally, our hospitals have needed to care for large numbers of COVID-19 patients, many of whom are seriously ill.

    Because of our current success at distancing, today our hospitals are able to safely provide the usual level of care to the people who need it. This is also because of many major changes hospitals and healthcare systems have made to their usual operations in order to prepare to care for large numbers of COVID-19 cases.

    But if we should get a dramatic spike in people who need to be hospitalized, it will badly stretch the system. In the worst scenarios, it could result in severe scarcity issues where it could be extremely difficult to meet the demand for lifesaving care. We must do everything we can to prevent getting to that level of crisis. It’s the most compelling reason to stay steady with social distancing as best we can.

    There seems to be a local historical lesson from the influenza pandemic in 1918. What happened then and what can we learn from it?

    During that influenza pandemic, the health officer and the mayor of Seattle put some pretty strong social distancing measures in place, and the city fared much better than other cities at the beginning. But when victory was declared in World War One, people emerged out of their homes in celebration, and then all the closures and prohibitions against mass gatherings ended. Shortly thereafter, there was a serious second wave of illness that lasted for several months. It’s a sobering lesson about the danger of prematurely relaxing social distancing.

    At the same time, we need to consider the hardship that a prolonged Stay Home order could have on those who are struggling to get by. So we’ll be continually evaluating what aspects of social distancing need to stay in place, and what could be scaled back.

    What needs to happen before social distancing measures could scale back?

    When it appears safe, we will need to consider the gradual relaxing of one or more of our social distancing measures and carefully begin resume of our normal “pre-COVID-19” activities. These measures include the Governor’s Stay at Home order and school closures, cancellation of gatherings, and directive to stay six feet apart. During this time we will need to carefully monitor COVID-19 illnesses and deaths and our healthcare system’s ability to cope so that we can adjust course quickly if things head in a dangerous direction.

    Some key indicators we’ll look closely at include:

    How many people are getting sick from COVID-19:

    We would want to see a steady decrease in the number of people getting sick and needing hospitalization for at least 2 weeks before we do anything that may make those numbers go up.

    Health care system readiness:

    When social distancing measures loosen, we should expect to see an increase in cases. We need to make sure our health care system has what it needs in terms of staff, bed space, medical supplies, and equipment to take care of the sick people in our community before we discontinue social distancing measures.

    Testing:

    Our ability to keep COVID-19 cases at a manageable level after relaxing social distancing measures requires widespread availability of rapid testing and reporting of results so that people who are infected can take quick action to prevent the spread of COVID-19. That is not yet available.

    Testing is necessary to have the most accurate picture of the extent and spread of the outbreak to inform strategies for relaxing social distancing. Widespread testing is also necessary for public health disease investigation to decrease community spread of infection.

    Public Health readiness:

    Public health agencies will need capacity to do a large number of thorough case and contact investigations in order to identify people who are infected and their close contacts. This would be necessary so that these people are quickly isolated or quarantined in order to limit spread to others. This is the main thing that needs to happen to allow us to start resuming normal activities safely while avoiding a dangerous increase in new illnesses. People will need to understand the critical importance of isolating themselves when ill and rapidly helping inform their close contacts so they can quarantine themselves away from others and be tested if necessary based on guidance from public health.

    To be successful, this work will need to occur at an unprecedented scale and speed, many times beyond what public health departments across the country can do currently. It requires a massive and rapid infusion of resources including disease investigators and information management tools.

    Availability of proven treatments:

    There are multiple therapies currently under evaluation to treat people with COVID-19, and the availability of these therapies will also be considered in our calculus of when to ease up on the mitigation measures.

    How do we consider the threat of a rebound of COVID-19 along with the needs of the community?

    We must continue to advocate for and provide support to those who are suffering from unintended economic and social impacts of this necessary disease control strategy.

    If people cannot practice social distancing or stay in isolation and quarantine because they fear losing their jobs, or because there is no one to help them get the food or medication they need, not only are will they be at increased risk for infection but it will prolong and worsen the outbreak for all of us. The degree to which we can provide support for all of our residents so that they can make safe choices will have benefit to the entire community. This includes access to wage and employment security, food security, childcare, sustainable rent assistance and evictions protections, and paid sick leave. It also includes strong support for seniors and people with disabilities.

    Small businesses should have access to grants and loans to keep business open should they need to close due to lack of staffing for a period of time while employees are recovering.

    Keep in mind that we may be able to relax some measures while retaining others so that we can take a more measured approach. For example, it’s possible that the Stay Home order or school closures could be lifted while the directive to stay six feet apart will stay in place. It will depend on what the key indicators tell us about the safety of relaxing the measures.

    For frequent updates on COVID-19, follow Public Health Insider or go to http://www.kingcounty.gov/covid.

    Originally posted on Public Health Insider, a publication of Public Health Seattle - King County on April 10, 2020.


    Published by Public Health Insider, a publication of Public Health Seattle - King County (PHSKC)

    The danger of ending social distancing too early: A conversation with our Health Officer

    By , PHSKC

    You may have heard about a couple of recent studies that suggest that our social distancing measures appear to be making a difference in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in King County. That’s encouraging news.

    The studies also emphasize that we need to continue to stay strong with the stay at home order if we are to continue to succeed in decreasing and delaying the outbreak peak. But we also see the enormous economic toll that social distancing orders are creating.

    To understand more about where we are in the outbreak and what it would take to relax some of the social distancing measures, we asked our health officer, Dr. Jeff Duchin to talk about both the communicable disease aspects and undesirable consequences of COVID-19.

    If the initial studies suggest that our efforts at social distancing are working to “flatten the curve,” why is it so important to stay steadfast with the Stay Home order and other social distancing measures?

    People in King County deserve the credit for making a real difference in the course of this outbreak by staying at home and decreasing non-essential close contact with others. I understand how difficult this is. Everyone should know that these sacrifices are preventing many illnesses and deaths throughout our community, including family members, friends and loved ones, and co-workers.

    The modeling done by IHME at the University of Washington is somewhat reassuring, but the conclusions are not certain. For example, the model assumes that our outbreak is similar to Wuhan, China and that the current social distancing efforts are unchanged over time. It doesn’t show what happens if people stop complying or are not as effective as they assume.

    Our success at distancing has limited the number of people that have been infected, and that also means most of us remain susceptible to the virus. If we go back to business as usual, many people will be infected relatively quickly because COVID-19 remains circulating in the population. We remain at risk for a large outbreak that would overwhelm the healthcare system. That’s why the recent studies clearly state that we need to continue to stay strong with the Stay Home order for now.

    No one should take these findings as an indication to relax our social distancing strategy at this time. The threat of a rebound that could overwhelm the healthcare system remains if we let up too soon.

    What does it look like if the healthcare system is overwhelmed?

    Right now we’re witnessing that in other places, such as New York City, where they are short on healthcare workers and critical resources to provide the usual level of care that people expect from our hospitals. And even though we’ve “flattened the curve” and decreased the number who are infected locally, our hospitals have needed to care for large numbers of COVID-19 patients, many of whom are seriously ill.

    Because of our current success at distancing, today our hospitals are able to safely provide the usual level of care to the people who need it. This is also because of many major changes hospitals and healthcare systems have made to their usual operations in order to prepare to care for large numbers of COVID-19 cases.

    But if we should get a dramatic spike in people who need to be hospitalized, it will badly stretch the system. In the worst scenarios, it could result in severe scarcity issues where it could be extremely difficult to meet the demand for lifesaving care. We must do everything we can to prevent getting to that level of crisis. It’s the most compelling reason to stay steady with social distancing as best we can.

    There seems to be a local historical lesson from the influenza pandemic in 1918. What happened then and what can we learn from it?

    During that influenza pandemic, the health officer and the mayor of Seattle put some pretty strong social distancing measures in place, and the city fared much better than other cities at the beginning. But when victory was declared in World War One, people emerged out of their homes in celebration, and then all the closures and prohibitions against mass gatherings ended. Shortly thereafter, there was a serious second wave of illness that lasted for several months. It’s a sobering lesson about the danger of prematurely relaxing social distancing.

    At the same time, we need to consider the hardship that a prolonged Stay Home order could have on those who are struggling to get by. So we’ll be continually evaluating what aspects of social distancing need to stay in place, and what could be scaled back.

    What needs to happen before social distancing measures could scale back?

    When it appears safe, we will need to consider the gradual relaxing of one or more of our social distancing measures and carefully begin resume of our normal “pre-COVID-19” activities. These measures include the Governor’s Stay at Home order and school closures, cancellation of gatherings, and directive to stay six feet apart. During this time we will need to carefully monitor COVID-19 illnesses and deaths and our healthcare system’s ability to cope so that we can adjust course quickly if things head in a dangerous direction.

    Some key indicators we’ll look closely at include:

    How many people are getting sick from COVID-19:

    We would want to see a steady decrease in the number of people getting sick and needing hospitalization for at least 2 weeks before we do anything that may make those numbers go up.

    Health care system readiness:

    When social distancing measures loosen, we should expect to see an increase in cases. We need to make sure our health care system has what it needs in terms of staff, bed space, medical supplies, and equipment to take care of the sick people in our community before we discontinue social distancing measures.

    Testing:

    Our ability to keep COVID-19 cases at a manageable level after relaxing social distancing measures requires widespread availability of rapid testing and reporting of results so that people who are infected can take quick action to prevent the spread of COVID-19. That is not yet available.

    Testing is necessary to have the most accurate picture of the extent and spread of the outbreak to inform strategies for relaxing social distancing. Widespread testing is also necessary for public health disease investigation to decrease community spread of infection.

    Public Health readiness:

    Public health agencies will need capacity to do a large number of thorough case and contact investigations in order to identify people who are infected and their close contacts. This would be necessary so that these people are quickly isolated or quarantined in order to limit spread to others. This is the main thing that needs to happen to allow us to start resuming normal activities safely while avoiding a dangerous increase in new illnesses. People will need to understand the critical importance of isolating themselves when ill and rapidly helping inform their close contacts so they can quarantine themselves away from others and be tested if necessary based on guidance from public health.

    To be successful, this work will need to occur at an unprecedented scale and speed, many times beyond what public health departments across the country can do currently. It requires a massive and rapid infusion of resources including disease investigators and information management tools.

    Availability of proven treatments:

    There are multiple therapies currently under evaluation to treat people with COVID-19, and the availability of these therapies will also be considered in our calculus of when to ease up on the mitigation measures.

    How do we consider the threat of a rebound of COVID-19 along with the needs of the community?

    We must continue to advocate for and provide support to those who are suffering from unintended economic and social impacts of this necessary disease control strategy.

    If people cannot practice social distancing or stay in isolation and quarantine because they fear losing their jobs, or because there is no one to help them get the food or medication they need, not only are will they be at increased risk for infection but it will prolong and worsen the outbreak for all of us. The degree to which we can provide support for all of our residents so that they can make safe choices will have benefit to the entire community. This includes access to wage and employment security, food security, childcare, sustainable rent assistance and evictions protections, and paid sick leave. It also includes strong support for seniors and people with disabilities.

    Small businesses should have access to grants and loans to keep business open should they need to close due to lack of staffing for a period of time while employees are recovering.

    Keep in mind that we may be able to relax some measures while retaining others so that we can take a more measured approach. For example, it’s possible that the Stay Home order or school closures could be lifted while the directive to stay six feet apart will stay in place. It will depend on what the key indicators tell us about the safety of relaxing the measures.

    For frequent updates on COVID-19, follow Public Health Insider or go to http://www.kingcounty.gov/covid.

    Originally posted on Public Health Insider, a publication of Public Health Seattle - King County on April 10, 2020.

  • Closed: All Playgrounds and Sport Courts

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    2 months ago
    Mar 20, 2020 - As part of its evolving response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and with guidance from Public Health – Seattle & King County (PHSKC), the City of Mercer Island is closing all park playgrounds, sport courts, and picnic shelters, effective immediately.

    On Saturday morning, March 21, parks staff will post signage at these facilities, and at nearby park entrances.

    “With schools closed and many more people working from home, our extensive parks and open spaces are providing much-needed mental and physical stress-relief,” said interim Parks and Recreation Director Ryan Daly. “But we have determined that it’s in the best interest of all park patrons to close playgrounds, courts, and picnic shelters. Park patrons should also avoid gatherings, team sports, and pick-up games.”

    The City’s many parks, trails, and open spaces will remain OPEN, as will park restrooms provided park patrons adhere to Public Health guidelines. “This is an unprecedented situation and we want to keep our parks open for casual visits, but we absolutely need the community’s support and adherence to social-distancing guidelines,” said City Manager Jessi Bon. “Let’s work together to keep everyone safe in our outdoor park spaces.”

    Residents are encouraged to get out and enjoy the sunshine, while following Public Health guidelines:
    Practice social distancing, leaving at least 6 feet between others.
    Wash hands often with soap and water; if not available, use hand sanitizer.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home while you are sick and avoid close contact with others.
    • Cover your mouth/nose with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing.
    For directions and a list of great park opportunities visit this page.

    Parks and Recreation staff are collecting photos of the creative ways you, your family, and even your pets, are still enjoying the outdoors while practicing safe social distancing; please Email your photos to katie.herzog@mercergov.org.


    Mar 20, 2020 - As part of its evolving response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and with guidance from Public Health – Seattle & King County (PHSKC), the City of Mercer Island is closing all park playgrounds, sport courts, and picnic shelters, effective immediately.

    On Saturday morning, March 21, parks staff will post signage at these facilities, and at nearby park entrances.

    “With schools closed and many more people working from home, our extensive parks and open spaces are providing much-needed mental and physical stress-relief,” said interim Parks and Recreation Director Ryan Daly. “But we have determined that it’s in the best interest of all park patrons to close playgrounds, courts, and picnic shelters. Park patrons should also avoid gatherings, team sports, and pick-up games.”

    The City’s many parks, trails, and open spaces will remain OPEN, as will park restrooms provided park patrons adhere to Public Health guidelines. “This is an unprecedented situation and we want to keep our parks open for casual visits, but we absolutely need the community’s support and adherence to social-distancing guidelines,” said City Manager Jessi Bon. “Let’s work together to keep everyone safe in our outdoor park spaces.”

    Residents are encouraged to get out and enjoy the sunshine, while following Public Health guidelines:
    Practice social distancing, leaving at least 6 feet between others.
    Wash hands often with soap and water; if not available, use hand sanitizer.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home while you are sick and avoid close contact with others.
    • Cover your mouth/nose with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing.
    For directions and a list of great park opportunities visit this page.

    Parks and Recreation staff are collecting photos of the creative ways you, your family, and even your pets, are still enjoying the outdoors while practicing safe social distancing; please Email your photos to katie.herzog@mercergov.org.


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  • Social Distancing Guidelines

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    2 months ago



  • Protective Measures

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    3 months ago

    These are steps you can take proactively to reduce the spread of novel coronavirus:

    • If sick (fever/cough) STAY HOME.
    • Cover your sneeze or cough with a tissue or your arm.

    • Wash your hands or use alcohol-based sanitizer often throughout the day.

    • Get in the habit of NOT touching your face so often.

    • Disinfect high-touch areas throughout the day. Don’t forget phones, light switches, door handles, and keyboards.

    • Forgo the handshake for a wave or “elbow bump”.

    • Eat healthy, stay hydrated, and get plenty of rest.

    To prepare for a pandemic at home you should consider:

    These are steps you can take proactively to reduce the spread of novel coronavirus:

    • If sick (fever/cough) STAY HOME.
    • Cover your sneeze or cough with a tissue or your arm.

    • Wash your hands or use alcohol-based sanitizer often throughout the day.

    • Get in the habit of NOT touching your face so often.

    • Disinfect high-touch areas throughout the day. Don’t forget phones, light switches, door handles, and keyboards.

    • Forgo the handshake for a wave or “elbow bump”.

    • Eat healthy, stay hydrated, and get plenty of rest.

    To prepare for a pandemic at home you should consider:

    • Having plans to care for family members when schools, daycares, or senior centers are closed. It is encouraged to have a plan and a backup plan.

    • Having enough non-perishable food at home so trips to the grocery store can be limited or avoided for at least 3 – 4 weeks.

    • Cleaning your living area more often, including wiping down small electronics, door handles, and other items commonly touched by many people.

  • If you believe you have been exposed to or have symptoms

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    2 months ago

    In King County, there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19. We are likely to see many more cases of COVID-19 in the coming days and weeks. Symptoms of COVID-19 typically include fever, cough or shortness of breath.
    • Call your doctor – Do not go into the medical facility

    • Your doctor will make an assessment about next steps. If it is determined that you should be screened for COVID-19, your doctor will contact King County Public Health to make arrangements for screening.

    • Take all appropriate precautions. Do not go to work if you are sick. Wash your hands...

    In King County, there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19. We are likely to see many more cases of COVID-19 in the coming days and weeks. Symptoms of COVID-19 typically include fever, cough or shortness of breath.

    • Call your doctor – Do not go into the medical facility

    • Your doctor will make an assessment about next steps. If it is determined that you should be screened for COVID-19, your doctor will contact King County Public Health to make arrangements for screening.

    • Take all appropriate precautions. Do not go to work if you are sick. Wash your hands often and do not touch your face.

    Please stay informed and prepared. We’ll continue to keep the community updated via our website, Facebook and Twitter accounts.

    For more information, follow this link to Public Health Seattle and King County.

  • King County Coronavirus Call Center

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    2 months ago

    King County established a Coronavirus Call Center on March 3.

    • If you are in King County and believe you were exposed to a confirmed case of COVID-19, or if you're a healthcare provider with questions about COVID-19, contact our novel coronavirus call center: 206-477-3977.

    • The call center will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. PST.

    • For general questions about COVID-19 or Washington State's response, please call the Washington State Novel Coronavirus Call Center at 800-525-0127

    King County established a Coronavirus Call Center on March 3.

    • If you are in King County and believe you were exposed to a confirmed case of COVID-19, or if you're a healthcare provider with questions about COVID-19, contact our novel coronavirus call center: 206-477-3977.

    • The call center will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. PST.

    • For general questions about COVID-19 or Washington State's response, please call the Washington State Novel Coronavirus Call Center at 800-525-0127

  • County, State, Federal Updates

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    2 months ago

    March 18 - Governor announces relief for business, workers, tenants and more in response to COVID-19 outbreak

    March 16 - Governor issues statewide shutdown of restaurants, bars and limits on size of gatherings expanded

    March 13 - Governor expands school closure/gathering ban statewide

    March 13 - President declares national emergency

    March 12 - Governor orders K-12 school closure through April 24 in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties

    March 11 - Pandemic: Governor/King County issue health orders limiting events, mandating social distancing...

    March 18 - Governor announces relief for business, workers, tenants and more in response to COVID-19 outbreak

    March 16 - Governor issues statewide shutdown of restaurants, bars and limits on size of gatherings expanded

    March 13 - Governor expands school closure/gathering ban statewide

    March 13 - President declares national emergency

    March 12 - Governor orders K-12 school closure through April 24 in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties

    March 11 - Pandemic: Governor/King County issue health orders limiting events, mandating social distancing