COVID-19 Information

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The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and more.

Click on the shortcut buttons below to access the most requested information.



The City of Mercer Island is committed to sharing up-to-date information on the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the community. These pages share the latest information, resources, and more.

Click on the shortcut buttons below to access the most requested information.


  • How COVID Vaccines Are Made

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    Have questions about the COVID-19 vaccine? The Washington State Dept. of Health put together this video to help answer them. Check it out!


  • Emergency Warning Signs of COVID-19

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    As we head into cold and flu season, it is important to understand the symptoms of COVID-19 and when to seek medical help.

    The CDC reminds us to keep an eye on our flu-like symptoms that could be COVID-19. If you or a family member is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

    • Trouble breathing
    • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    • New confusion
    • Inability to wake or stay awake
    • Bluish lips or face

    Call 9-1-1 or call ahead to your local emergency facility. Make sure to notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.


    As a reminder, people with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

    • Fever or chills
    • Cough
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
    • Fatigue
    • Muscle or body aches
    • Headache
    • New loss of taste or smell
    • Sore throat
    • Congestion or runny nose
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Diarrhea

    This list does not include all possible symptoms. Contact your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

    Learn more about caring for yourself or others:

    For more information or to use the CDC's Coronavirus Self-Checker, click here.

  • Updated High-Risk List

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    The CDC updated the high-risk list, and it’s not just older adults.

    The latest scientific studies reviewed by the CDC show that people with the following conditions, or suffer from the following, are also more at risk of severe illness from COVID-19, regardless of their age:

    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Chronic lung disease
    • People who have had organ transplants
    • Serious heart conditions
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Type 2 diabetes
    • Asthma
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • High blood pressure
    • Dementia
    • Liver disease
    • Type 1 diabetes
    • A weakened immune system

    The latest evidence also suggests that obesity is another high risk factor, and that pregnant women and smokers might be at increased risk. For the full list and more information, visit the CDC website.

    If you are in a group that the CDC has identified as high-risk or needing extra precautions, avoid contact outside the home as much as possible. Everyone should continue to:

    • Wear face coverings.
    • Stay at least six feet away from other people.
    • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly.
    • Avoid large group activities - Phase 2 only allows for gatherings of less than 5 people from outside your household.
    • When gathering, do so outside - ventilation helps.
  • Statewide Face Mask Requirements

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    It's official - face coverings are now required in most public places in Washington and businesses must refuse service to anyone not wearing a mask.

    Updated July 14: On June 23, Governor Jay Inslee and Secretary of Health John Wiesman announced an order mandating the use of cloth face coverings in most public areas. The order took effect June 26. Shortly after, Governor Inslee announced a statewide order for businesses to refuse service to patrons who are not wearing face coverings. The order went into effect Tuesday, July 7.

    Individuals are required to wear face coverings in indoor public spaces like stores, offices, and restaurants. The order also requires face coverings outdoors when individuals can't stay 6 feet apart.

    Face covering may be removed when seated at a restaurant or when recreating alone. Individuals do not need to wear a cloth face covering in their home when they are only with people in their household, alone in their car, or outdoors and people are far apart.

    Exemptions. People with certain disabilities or health conditions, are deaf or hard of hearing, and children under the age of 5 (though it's encouraged to have children ages 3-5 wear a covering if possible) are not required to wear face coverings.

    Enforcement. Customers who are concerned that a business is not adequately enforcing the face mask order or other Safe Start requirements can submit an anonymous complaint. Violations can be enforced by Labor & Industries as a safety and health violation by the employer that could carry a penalty of nearly $10,000 or more. Individuals not following the DOH order on face coverings may be subject to a misdemeanor charge with a fine of up to $100 and/or up to 90 days in county jail per RCW 43.70.130(7), RCW 70.05.120(4), and WAC 246-100-070(3). Click here for more information.

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    Still need a face covering? Please contact the City's COVID-19 Hotline, 206-275-7626 or coronavirus@mercergov.org. The City also hosts regular distribution events in City parks and Town Center. If you need a face covering now, check out this very simple, 45-second video on how to make a covering out of a t-shirt or check out other DIY, no-sew face covering options.

    Wear it right! We're still seeing people who are not quite wearing face coverings correctly. Make sure you are following best practices. And don't forget to wash your face coverings regularly!

    It really does help! The CDC just released a report highlighting the effectiveness of face coverings against COVID-19 transmission. Click here to read their report.

    More. Click through these links to learn more about Face Coverings and Children and the Science of Masks.

  • UPDATED COVID-19 Symptoms

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    The CDC just added new symptoms to its list of known symptoms.

    Researchers are continuing to learn more about COVID-19. People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with the following symptoms may have COVID-19:


    • Fever or chills
    • Cough
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
    • Fatigue
    • Muscle or body aches
    • Headache
    • New loss of taste or smell
    • Sore throat
    • Congestion or runny nose
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Diarrhea

    Contact your healthcare provider if you experience these symptoms.

  • King County Coronavirus Call Center

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    King County established a Coronavirus Call Center on March 3.

    • If you are in King County and believe you were exposed to a confirmed case of COVID-19, or if you're a healthcare provider with questions about COVID-19, contact our novel coronavirus call center: 206-477-3977.

    • The call center will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. PST.

    • For general questions about COVID-19 or Washington State's response, please call the Washington State Novel Coronavirus Call Center at 800-525-0127

  • COMMUNITY Resources

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    This community has a longstanding and extensive emergency preparedness network composed of many hundreds of trained volunteers with relationships across all neighborhoods.

    While the City does not have the capacity to check in on all vulnerable populations, we encourage "neighbor to neighbor" support during this time. For example, if you are aware of an elderly resident concerned about leaving their home, you may be able to help by delivering meals or groceries - remember to follow Public Health guidelines for social distancing to prevent an unintentional exposure.

    The City’s Youth and Family Services Department provides case management and mental health services to Island seniors and these will continue during the outbreak.


    For more information, documents, and helpful links visit our COMMUNITY resources page.

  • What Happens When You Get a COVID-19 Test?

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    You wake up one morning with a new cough and a slight fever, and you’re not sure what to do. You’re worried it might be COVID, so what are your next steps? Getting tested is one of the best ways to protect your family, friends, and community, but if you’ve never been tested before, you might be a little nervous. Check out what really happens when you get a COVID test:

    Now that you've been tested, what do you do?

  • Support for Mercer Island BUSINESSES

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    The City is working closely with the Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce to provide information specific to businesses. As the virus spreads, some smaller establishments will be challenged by additional cleaning needs and/or reduced staffing due to quarantine concerns.

    For more information, documents, and links to useful websites visit our BUSINESS resources page.

    Wondering what RESTAURANTS are OPEN?
  • King County Data Dashboard

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    Updated October 1 - King County Public Health maintains several data dashboards that provide regular updates about COVID-19 cases and deaths, key trends and indicators of COVID-19 activity, long-term care information, and more.

    Daily Summary Dashboard

    Total cases, deaths, and demographics for the County. Zoom in on each city to get the latest local data. Updated daily between 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm. To access Mercer Island specific data, click on the City-level tab in the menu at the top of the charts. Once the City tab is open, select Mercer Island from the drop-down menu on the left-hand side of the page (see image to the right).

    Key Indicators of COVID-19 Activity Dashboard

    Key indicators and trends that track COVID-19 activity like outbreak growth, rate of hospitalization, and testing capacity. These indicators, along with other data, are key considerations for reviewing current restrictions on activity, recommendations, and precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Updated weekly on Tuesdays.

    Long-Term Care Facility Dashboard

    The data provided in the dashboard describes the impacts of COVID-19 on the residents and staff of long-term care facilities licensed by the State, including nursing homes, adult family homes, and assisted living facilities. Updated weekly on Thursdays.

    Economic, Social, and Overall Health Impacts Dashboard

    Shows changes in key economic, social, and other health indicators resulting from strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19. Updated weekly.

    Syndromic Surveillance Dashboard

    Emergency department visits and hospitalizations for COVID-like illness and pneumonia at King County healthcare facilities. Updated weekly on Wednesdays.

    Race/Ethnicity Dashboard

    Shows the impacts of COVID-19 on communities of color compared to whites in King County, WA. Updated weekly on Mondays.

    Have you ever wondered why the data changes? You've noticed the numbers are lower than the previous day? King County Public Health has answered seven of the most asked questions about their data dashboards. Check it out and see if they've answered your questions!

    Washington State COVID-19 Data Dashboard

    Looking for the latest information on state-wide case counts, epidemiologic curves, testing, hospitalizations or other information? The state has created a data dashboard complete with this information and more. Data is updated daily. Click here to visit the data dashboard.


    On March 25, Public Health—Seattle & King County launched a data dashboard that provides daily updates to COVID-19 cases and deaths. Visit www.kingcounty.gov/covid/data to see the dashboard.

    The dashboard provides data on how many people have tested positive in each city, age ranges of those who test positive or who have died, and more.

    King County will update the dashboard daily (between 1:00 and 2:00 p.m.), pending the receipt of data from key sources, including the Washington State Department of Health. The dashboard includes a timestamp of the most recent updates.

    Due to delays in reporting data from various laboratories, case totals are commonly reported two or three days later. While a graph showing the trend of COVID-19 cases may appear to be flat or declining, King County notes that we must assume that this does not actually represent a decline.

    Hover over key data points to reveal important information. A mobile version is also available.