COVID-19 Community Resources

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This page is dedicated to the many resources available to the Mercer Island Community.


Can't find what you're looking for? Use the search bar in the upper right-hand corner! We know there is A LOT of information on our coronavirus information and resource pages. If you can't find something, just type the topic in the search bar at the top of the page and you should be able to find it!



This page is dedicated to the many resources available to the Mercer Island Community.


Can't find what you're looking for? Use the search bar in the upper right-hand corner! We know there is A LOT of information on our coronavirus information and resource pages. If you can't find something, just type the topic in the search bar at the top of the page and you should be able to find it!


  • COVID-19 Child Care Support

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    01 Oct 2020
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    Do you need help with child care costs?

    You may qualify for financial assistance to pay for child care if you live or work in King County, fall within income guidelines and your income, work schedule, or access to child care has been negatively impacted by COVID-19 or you are an essential worker.

    The CARES emergency funding for COVID-19 child care supports will provide vouchers to eligible families to pay for child care costs at licensed child care providers between September and December 2020. The amount of vouchers depends on a child’s age and will be paid directly to the provider. Funding is also available to assist eligible families with the cost of child care co-pays under the Working Connections Child Care program or other subsidies.

    Program eligibility
    • Must be under 400% FPL
    • Must live or work in King County
    • Must be an essential worker or have been impacted by COVID-19
    • For children aged 0-12 at licensed child care sites

    To apply

    For more information, click here.

  • Celebrating Fall with Local Farms

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    24 Sep 2020
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    Time to get out and enjoy Fall with local farms!

    Local farms offer a wide variety of seasonal produce, fresh-cut flowers, cider, pumpkins, and more. Help support local farmers, hit especially hard by the pandemic, by visiting a farm and buying local. Not sure where to find an open farm? Look no further! Visit the Local Food Finder page or a special pumpkin patch page.

    It goes without saying... don't forget your face mask and make sure you are socially distancing while you tromp through rows of pumpkins!

    Looking for information about Halloween? Check out tips and guidance from King County Public Health and the CDC.

  • New Study Shows Vaping Increases COVID Chances

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    As COVID-19 spikes among young adults, research shows vaping is associated with catching COVID.

    Recent state data show adults ages 20 to 39 represent a higher percentage of coronavirus cases than any other age group in the state. This comes as vaping among teens and young adults in our state has also skyrocketed, with nearly 30 percent of high school seniors saying they use vapor products.

    A new study shows young people who reported ever having used e-cigarettes were five times more likely to test positive for COVID-19 than non-users.

    Teens and young adults who want to quit vaping or smoking can get access to several resources in Washington state. In January, the state Department of Health (DOH) began offering This is Quitting, from Truth Initiative. This first of its kind, free teen-friendly texting program for quitting vaping, was created with input from teens and young adults who attempted or succeeded in quitting e-cigarettes. This is Quitting is tailored by age group to give supportive text messages and information about quitting vaping.

    To enroll, teens and young adults can text VAPEFREEWA to 88709. Washington youth over the age of 13 can also call 1-800-QUIT-NOW to speak confidentially with a Quit Coach in English, Spanish, or receive support in more than 200 other languages.

    On Island, our YFS outpatient mental health counselors and school-based counselors provide substance abuse intervention and referral. We encourage Mercer Island residents seeking services or information to connect with YFS via our confidential intake line at 206-275-7657 or www.mercerisland.gov/yfs or contact their child’s YFS school counselor directly. To learn more about how you can get involved with the Healthy Youth Initiative visit: https://www.mercerisland.gov/yfs/page/healthy-youth-initiative-project.

    Read the full news release here.


  • Supporting Recovery Throughout the Pandemic

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    National Recovery Month is celebrated in the U.S. each September to promote access to recovery, celebrate those participating in services, and educate communities about overcoming the barriers of stigma and discrimination.

    Together as a community, we remember that behavioral health is essential to overall health and wellness and that prevention works, treatment is effective, and people do recover.

    The City's Department of Youth and Family Services (YFS) provides community-wide substance abuse prevention and mental health promotion services via the Healthy Youth Initiative. Derek Franklin, YFS Clinical Supervisor encourages us to connect during these unprecedented times, "I hope Recovery Month serves as a reminder that an important part of getting through the COVID-19 pandemic is to focus on personal connections, grow resiliency, set aside any stigma around seeking help, and get support for mental health or substance use issues - we're all in this together."

    YFS outpatient mental health counselors and school-based counselors provide mental health treatment and substance abuse intervention and referral. Mercer Island residents seeking services or information are encouraged to connect with YFS at (206) 275-7611 or www.mercerisland.gov/yfs or contact their child's YFS school counselor directly.

  • Extended! Summer Meals and Resources for Families in Need

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    07 Jul 2020
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    MIYFS Food Pantry

    Open Wednesdays, 10:00am - 3:00pm, at the Mercer Island Community and Event Center, for eligible Island residents only. Click here for more info.

    MIYFS Emergency Assistance Program

    If you are a resident facing food-insecurity or significant financial hardship, please contact Emergency Assistance Coordinator, Cheryl Manriquez, at Cheryl.Manriquez@mercergov.org

    King County Map of Free Food Resources

    Public Health – Seattle & King County and the City of Seattle recently released a map of free food resources, which will be updated weekly. This new tool includes information about resources across King County in order to provide emergency food during COVID-19. At the top of the map, use the drop down menu to filter options based on operational status. Select to highlight the type of food resource (food bank, food bank & meal, meal, and student to-go meals) using the colored legend. Hover over a resource to learn more about the services offered at that location.

    Healthcare and Food Security Learning Network

    The King County Healthcare and Food Security Learning Network is an existing coalition of healthcare providers, retailers, advocates, food distributors, educators, service navigators, program managers, and funders working together to increase food security. The map can be used to find food resources as well as support your local food organizations by donating and volunteering.

    USDA Extends Free Meals for Kids Through December 31, 2020

    On August 31, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will extend several flexibilities through as late as December 31, 2020. The flexibilities allow summer meal program operators to continue serving free meals to all children into the fall months. This unprecedented move will help ensure – no matter what the situation is on-the-ground – children have access to nutritious food as the country recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. USDA has been and continues to be committed to using the Congressionally appropriated funding that has been made available.

    To date, USDA has provided more than 3,000 flexibilities across these programs. USDA has also leveraged new and innovative approaches to feeding kids, including a public-private partnership that provided nearly 40 million meals directly to the doorsteps of low-income rural children. For more information on FNS’ response to COVID-19, visit fns.usda.gov/coronavirus.

    Information on the Pandemic Emergency School Meals Program (P-EBT)

    Families with children who are eligible and approved by their school district for free or reduced-price meals and who do not currently get Basic Food benefits, must apply online at washingtonconnection.org for P-EBT before August 31 or the start of the 2020-2021 school year—whichever is later. The information is available in Español | 漢語 | ភាសាខ្មែរ | 한국어 | ລາວ | русский | Af-Soomaali | Tiếng Việt.

    Summer free meal sites for youth

  • King County dedicates $41 million to COVID-19 related rental assistance and eviction prevention

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    21 Aug 2020
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    King County to provide over $41 million for eviction prevention and rental assistance that will help up to 10,000 households experiencing COVID-related economic challenges remain safe and stable in their homes.

    Individuals and families throughout King County economically impacted by COVID-19 due to illness, lost wages, and unemployment may apply for assistance through the King County Eviction Prevention and Rent Assistance Program as announced on August 20 by King County Executive Dow Constantine.

    The new program dedicates $41.4 million for emergency housing aid and is expected to assist 7,700 to 10,000 households across the region, including:

    • Eviction Prevention – United Way of King County ($5M)
    • Large Residential Property Fund ($17.9M)
    • Individual Household/Small Landlord Fund ($10M)
    • Manufactured Home Park Fund ($2M)

    Click here for more information.

  • COVID-19 Behavioral Health Toolbox for Families

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    19 Aug 2020
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    Help your family cope with emotional responses to COVID-19 by learning how to recognize the signs of pandemic stress and knowing what actions to take.

    The experience of children, teens, and families during the COVID-19 pandemic can be complicated and challenging. Some families will experience job losses and financial worries about basic necessities, such as housing, food, and insurance. Parents, children, and teens may lose contact with friends and family due to school closures and social distancing measures. They may worry about older adults or other family members who might have a bigger risk of serious

    Washington State's COVID-19 Behavioral Health Group and Behavioral Health Strike team have developed a toolbox that provides tips on how to understand emotional responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The toolbox highlights behaviors and responses for age-specific groups including (1) toddlers/preschool children, (2) school-age children, and (3) teens. Each age-specific section includes information on common emotional responses, helping children heal and grow, and managing feelings and behaviors children may experience.

    The document also provides information on the impacts of disasters on education as well as self-care recommendations for parents and caregivers. Click here to open the COVID-19 Behavioral Health Toolbox.

    The Behavioral Health Strike Team includes seven doctoral-level psychologists, one psychiatrist, and one Board Certified Couple and Family Psychologist.

  • Mercer Island Library Curbside To Go

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    19 Aug 2020
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    King County Library System is now offering curbside pick-up and returns!

    Mercer Island Library is one of several KCLS locations offering curbside to go options. Library patrons can return and pick up library materials in a safe, contact-free manner. Arrive by car, on foot, by bike and with or without an appointment!

    Mercer Island Library Hours

    • Tuesday-Wednesday 1pm-7:30pm
    • Thursday-Saturday 10am-4:30pm
    • Call (206) 236-3537

    Curbside to Go

    1. Make an appointment on the myLIBRO mobile app or call the library in advance to set the appointment for you. Learn how to schedule Curbside to GO holds pickup in the myLIBRO app. Download the app. (iOS, Android)

    2. Call the phone number on signs outside when you arrive at the library. Each library has a different phone number. Staff will book the earliest open appointment.

    3. Walk up without making a phone call to receive the earliest open appointment. Wait times may vary. The first open hour is the busiest hour. The last available pickup slot is 15 minutes before closing.

    How to Pick up Your Holds

    Patrons will get an email notification when your holds are ready. After receiving the email, go to the library for curbside pickup. Staff will place holds to pick up and go at the front entrance. Follow the instructions on the signs posted outside the library.

    Return Items

    Return all items through the manual book drop. (Returns may not be handed to staff in-person or through Self Check-In.)

    Returned items will be quarantined – and remain on your account – for a minimum of 3 days before being checked in. KCLS is not charging overdue fines right now, but all due dates and renewal limits still apply. Any fines or fees accrued during this time will be waived.

    Library patrons can also stop by to pick up a surprise bag of five book titles at any Curbside to Go location.

    For more information, visit the KCLS curbside information page.

  • Isolation and Quarantine Assistance through King County

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    12 Aug 2020
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    King County continues to offer community members a safe place to isolate, quarantine and recover from COVID-19. A new video shows what guests can expect.

    If you’ve been exposed to COVID-19 and are awaiting a test result or tested positive for COVID-19 and need a comfortable place to stay, King County’s isolation and quarantine centers are here for you.

    Having a safe place to isolate or quarantine away from vulnerable family members, group settings or if you don’t have a home, is critical to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and can also make your recovery more comfortable. King County’s Department of Community and Human Services quickly stood up centers throughout the County at the onset of the pandemic for this reason, and in partnership with Public Health—Seattle & King County, continues to operate and care for our community members who need a place to isolate or quarantine.

    Click here for more information about the difference between isolation and quarantine, facilities, and how King County can help. (Also available in Russian, Spanish, Chinese, and other languages.)

    To show guests what you can expect during a stay at one of King County’s isolation and quarantine centers, we took a tour and spoke to the team at our Issaquah site about the experience and care they provide.

    King County’s isolation and quarantine facilities have served more than 700 people so far and stand ready to serve more residents in our community as the pandemic continues. Isolation and quarantine are important and proven public health practices to prevent the spread of disease, and these facilities are doing just that, saving lives.

    Families with children. Individuals. Essential workers. People living in multigenerational households. First responders. Travelers. People experiencing homelessness. If you need a place to isolate or quarantine, we welcome you.

    Call the King County COVID-19 Call Center at (206) 477-3977 to see if isolation and quarantine services are right for you.

    Visit kingcounty.gov/community-human-services/COVID for more information.

    Originally published on August 10, 2020 in Public Health Insider.

  • You Have A Mask But Are You Wearing It Properly?

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    07 May 2020
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    Getting a mask was half the battle, now we need to make sure we're wearing them properly.

    We've all seen it. Someone is out in public, they have their mask on, but not "on." The mask covers their mouth but not their nose, is pushed down under their chin, or has gapping issues (gaposis central)! Here are a few tips to help make sure we're all wearing our masks for the best possible protection.

    • Before putting on a mask, clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
    • Cover mouth and nose with mask and make sure there are no gaps between your face and the mask.
    • Avoid touching the mask while using it; if you do, clean your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
    • Replace the mask with a new one as soon as it is damp and do not re-use single-use masks.
    • To remove the mask: remove it from behind – do not touch the front of mask; discard immediately in a closed bin; clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.

    Remember, even with a mask, make sure to maintain a distance of 6-feet from others.

    As of May 18, King County residents have been directed to wear face coverings in public when social distancing is not possible. In June, Governor Inslee followed suit, issuing a statewide directive requiring all Washingtonians to wear face coverings in most public settings. That order went into effect on June 26.

    Face Covering Exemptions: Some people (and children) may not be able to wear face coverings due to health and safety reasons. For more information about exemptions, visit this information page.